All posts by Strong Heart Warriors

Justice For Stolen Lives Protest – Rapid City and Omaha, August 16th

Justice For Stolen Lives March for Mariah High Hawk and Other Deaths of Indigenous People in Rapid City, Omaha on August 16th

Cante Tenza Okolakiciye – Strong Heart Warrior Society
Independent Lakota Nation

MEDIA ADVISORY: August 11, 2017 – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Primary Contact: Delbert High Hawk 605-389-2354
Secondary Contact: Canupa Gluha Mani at 605-517-1547
Email: cantetenza13@gmail.com

What: Justice for Stolen Lives March to protest the unexplained death of Mariah High Hawk and other Lakota and Native people subjected to the violence, death, and mistreatment from the Rapid City/Pennington County police. A sister protest is also called for in Omaha, NE.

When: Wednesday, August 16, 2017. March begins at 11:00am.

Where: March begins in the 1200 block of Silverleaf Avenue (where body was found) and continues to the Rapid City Police Department and Pennington County at 300 Kansas City St, Rapid City, SD 57701.   Details of the Omaha protest will be announced when they become available.

Who: Led by the Lakota Strong Heart Warrior Society of the Independent Lakota Nation with support from other groups and individuals. All Indigenous people are welcome and urged to bring photographs and stories of your lost loved ones. The violence and mistreatment must end!

New Information: A private detective of the High Hawk Family has interviewed many witnesses who saw Mariah High Hawk just before her death. A witness has come forward saying she knows the real story of the events leading to her late night demise. But the local police seem uninterested in following up on the information. We ask why no interest from the police and demand Justice for Mariah and all missing, murdered, and mistreated Native people!

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The Cante Tenza Okolakiciye or Strong Heart Warrior Society is a traditional Lakota warrior society as well as a modern day human rights movement to assert Lakota independence and enforce Indigenous rights for the Lakota and other Indigenous people of Turtle Island.

 

2017 Strong Heart Pine Ridge Food & Clothing Drive is On!

Every fall the Lakota Strong Heart Warrior Society delivers corn, beans, beets, potatoes, squash, and other vegetables to the traditional and grassroots people on Pine Ridge. Many of these people live out in the most rural areas and ravines and depend on these donations.

The fall food drive gives these grassroots Lakota the chance to can or pickle food to store for the lean winter months.

Strong Heart also harvests wild birds and distributes holiday meals if available including providing flour and other staples for foods like fry bread.

We also deliver new or lightly used warm winter clothes. We especially need new, quality winter clothing for children.

The Fall Food & Clothing Drive is in on! Please donate so we have the gas and materials to pick up donations from Nebraska, Utah, and surrounding areas that want to help the grassroots people. The time is now and for the next 2 months!

Your donations help support food security during the cold winter season and allow Strong Heart Warriors to continue to feed and support the traditional and grassroots Lakota. Hoka Hey!

Direct donations and questions on additional food donations can be directed to Strong Heart headman Canupa Gluha Mani at 605-517-1547.

All donors will receive a Red Cry CD or handmade Lakota artwork as a sign of our thanks!”

Pilamaye! Thank you!

Covenant of Free Access to Traditional Lakota Territory

On Friday July 7, 2017, the Strong Heart Warrior Society of the Independent Lakota Nation met with officials of the Black Hills National Forest in Custer, SD to discuss access of the Black Hills by Lakota Oyate, Indigenous peoples, their relatives and agents.

During the roughly 45 minute meeting, the Independent Lakota Nation delivered notice with the Covenant of Free Access to Traditional Lakota Territory for Lakota Oyate, Indigenous People, Lakota Relatives & Our Agents.

In attendance for Independent Lakota Nation, Canupa Gluha Mani, Ana Oian Amets, Ezeder Tzorginda, Aranean Argi.  In attendance for the U.S. Forest Service Black Hills was Supervisor,Mark Van Every, Deputy Forest Supervisor Jerry Krueger , and Special Agent Travis Lunders.

Strong Heart encourages ALL Lakota and Indigenous people to assert independent jurisdiction within unceeded Lakota Territory by exercising customary rights to hunt, fish, and gather medicines as well as refuse to pay the U.S. Forest Service or their contractors for access to Lakota Territory at recreation areas and similar locations.

The Lakota Solidarity Project is organizing a 2017 Jurisdiction Camp to assert and monitor Lakota access and jurisdiction across the Black Hills and surrounding territory.  Support the camp by volunteering or making a donation. Thankyou!

Download the covenant in PDF format.

Text Version

Covenant of Free Access to Traditional Lakota Territory for Lakota Oyate, Indigenous People, Lakota Relatives & Our Agents

July 7, 2017   |   Original: English

“As long as the grass grows and the rivers flow, this land will always be yours.” 
Promise made to the Tetuwan Lakota Oyate by the United States Government

Whereas the Tetuwan Lakota Oyate is an original first nation of people on Turtle Island and has occupied its territorial land base (hereafter Lakota Territory) since time immemorial into present including modern day portions of the states known as South Dakota, North Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, and Nebraska.

Whereas the Tetuwan Lakota Oyate has never relinquished nation status and retains all inherent, natural rights of a nation including the right of customary tenure, aboriginal title, as well as free and unrestricted access and use of its territorial land base to develop and preserve Lakota customary political, social, economic, and cultural institutions.

Whereas the Independent Lakota Nation represents the intergenerational assertion of independent nation status that began with treaty making between the Oceti Sakowin and the United States Government in the mid-late 1800s and has been subsequently represented to the United States and the International Community by Chief He Dog, the Grey Eagle Society, 1973 Wounded Knee declaration; Chief John Grass, and the Lakota Freedom Delegation among others.

Whereas He Sapa or the Black Hills is customary Lakota Territory and has been recognized by the United States Government as judicially unceeded, stolen land (United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians; 1980); and, the Tetuwan Lakota Oyate have never accepted payment or compensation that would extinguish inherent title or customary jurisdiction to this territory.

Whereas the Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their relatives have the customary, international, and judicially recognized rights to access unappropriated government or public lands for the purposes of hunting, fishing, gathering of medicinal plants and foods, ceremonial activities, and any other activities that preserve and advance customary social, cultural, religious, economic, and political knowledge and institutions.

Therefore by virtue of the preceding facts, the Independent Lakota Nation declares the following Covenant of Free Access in official notice to the United States Government, state governments, local governments, and the general public:

Covenant 1

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents maintain free and unrestricted access to all unappropriated government lands and facilities within the boundaries of Lakota Territory including United States National Forest lands, U.S. Park lands and national monuments, U.S. National Grasslands, U.S. Bureau of Land Management lands, U.S. Recreation lands, state forests, state parks, wildlife/game management areas, and all similar unappropriated government lands and associated facilities such as parking areas, restrooms, boat ramps, and campgrounds.

Covenant 2

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents shall not be subjected to fees, licenses, or other administrative burdens that would prevent their free and uninterrupted access to unappropriated government lands and their associated public facilities in Lakota Territory.

Covenant 3

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents maintain their rights to hunting, fishing, and gathering of plants and customary medicines without Federal or State regulation, harassment or interference, including license or bag limits, and in all seasons of the year. This Covenant only applies to the classes listed above and does not apply to non-Indigenous persons accompanying Indigenous persons exercising their inherent rights.

Covenant 4

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents shall exercise the right to maintain, protect, and have access in privacy to spiritual and cultural sites; to use and control ceremonial objects associated with customary activities; to create, construct, and use in privacy dwellings, gathering places, encampments, or other temporary or permanent structures associated with the exercise of inherent rights; and, to protect, defend, or otherwise ensure the care of Indigenous human or cultural remains within Lakota Territory.

Covenant 5

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents or guests shall be identified by their presentation or use of Indigenous identification cards, licenses and passports denoting Indigenous ethnicity, license plates, and other forms of Indigenous identification.

Covenant 6

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents shall be free from any act of bias or discrimination, or any act depriving or dispossessing them from access to their land by United States employees, their contractors or concessionaires, or by other local, state or Federal officers or agents in the exercise of their duties.

Covenant 7

The Tetuwan Lakota Oyate, bands of the Oceti Sakowin, Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, and their customary relatives and agents maintain the right to assert and display Lakota jurisdiction across unappropriated government lands including the placing of temporary or permanent signs, historical markers, survey flags, prayer ties, or other items of cultural significance without fear of removal by local, state or Federal officers or agents in the exercise of their duties.

Signed and delivered on the _______ day of ______________­­­­­_ in the year __________;

__________________________________________________

Canupa Gluha Mani, Itacan, Strong Heart Warrior Society, Independent Lakota Nation

__________________________________________________

Mark Van Every, Supervisor, Black Hills National Forest, United States Forest Service

__________________________________________________

Ana Oian Amets, Strategic Communications, Strong Heart Warrior Society, Independent Lakota Nation

__________________________________________________

Meeting Participant

__________________________________________________

Meeting Participant

__________________________________________________

Meeting Participant

__________________________________________________

Meeting Participant

 

 

 

Asserting Lakota Jurisdiction in the Black Hills

Despite years of work by Strong Heart with the U.S. Forest Service and Park Service in the Black Hills, Lakota and other Indigenous people are subjected to illegal fees to access unceded Lakota territory, harassment for participating in traditional activities, and racist practices by Forest Service contractors like Forest Recreation Management Inc.

Strong Heart recently visited Lake Pactola and Forest Recreation Management tried to make us pay.  WE SAID NO!

Their employee from Michigan ignorantly says Black Hills USED to belong to the Lakota.  Somebody needs a history lesson!

This has sparked another meeting with the Forest Service and we are developing a covenant of free use guidelines for Lakota and other Indigenous peoples in Lakota Territory. Stay Tuned!

Special Report: Facing the Enemy Within – Criminal Corruption & Collusion in the Oglala Sioux Tribe Judiciary & Police

Special Report: Facing the Enemy Within – Criminal Corruption & Collusion in the Oglala Sioux Tribe Judiciary & Police

False Charges, Forged Documents, OST Tribal Council Uses Police and Judiciary to Silence Grassroots Lakota Elders and People; Outspoken Elders Threatened with Illegal Removal to Nursing Homes

TO:  U.S. Senator John Thune; U.S. Senator Mike Rounds; U.S. Representative Kristi Noem

FROM: Cante Tenza Okolakiciye – Strong Heart Warrior Society of the Independent Lakota Nation

DATE: June 28, 2017

OFFICIAL CONTACT: Canupa Gluha Mani at 605-517-1547

Photo credit: Rapid City Journal

The Cante Tenza Strong Heart Warrior Society of the Independent Lakota Nation is submitting an Official Complaint to the United States Government via U.S. Senators John Thune and Mike Rounds, and U.S. Representative Kristi Noem.

 Federally funded Justice programs run by the Oglala Sioux Tribe on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation are being used to criminalize outspoken Lakota elders and strong-arm consent from grassroots Lakota people seeking an end to the wide spread criminal conspiracy and corruption on the reservation.

The Lakota Strong Heart Warrior Society has spent years trying to raise public attention to the abuses faced by the grassroots Lakota people at the hands of the Oglala Sioux Tribe Government and Tribal Council (OST), it’s law enforcement and court system.  But with little public attention and continued negligence of United States Senators and the Department of Justice to hold these funded programs accountable – the crisis continues to worsen.

But the situation may have reached a turning point.  In early 2017, 94 year old Cecilia Martin was illegally removed from her home and forced into a nursing home hours away from her family and friends in an act of political retaliation against her outspoken activism and that of her grandson who leads the Strong Heart Warrior Society.

“She was the touchstone for younger grandmothers,” said a Lakota grandmother whose name has been withheld to avoid retaliation. “When she was removed into the nursing home, families got scared for their own grandmothers.”

Removing Martin into a South Dakota run nursing home took a criminal conspiracy to enact.  OST councilwoman Beverly Tuttle, long a focus of grassroots activists, was publicly reported as threatening to remove elders to distant nursing homes if the grassroots Lakota elders would not stop speaking out in tribal council proceedings.

“The system uses family members to attack other family members,” another anonymous source said. “If someone is a part of the corruption, they will even target their own family to keep the corruption going.”

This is where Carmen Martin Yellow Bull enters the story. An employee of the OST Judiciary office and previously implicated in the LOLO ‘money-for-foster-children’ scam in the documentary Red Cry,  Yellow Bull  drafted and forged paperwork removing her own grandmother from her small home in Porcupine to a nursing facility far in the Black Hills.  To shield her crime, she accused her brother and warrior leader Canupa Gluha Mani of failing to care for their grandmother, using her position in the Judiciary to issue a restraining order against him without any legal oversight or due-process.

These kinds of brazen attacks are not new. A similar tactic was used by the OST during the 2011 elder-led takeover of the Porcupine Meals for the Elderly Building to protest systemic abuse, neglect, and inedible food faced by grassroots elders at the center.  The OST created five false charges of elder abuse to hold Canupa Gluha Mani as a political prisoner for 31 days in attempts to force the end of the elder occupation.

“The OST has routinely allowed their own tribal advocates to break the law,” explained Canupa Gluha Mani. “Now there is no law, there is only survival.”

Despite numerous in-person meetings by Strong Heart and public efforts at exposing this corrupt system, the United States Government appears satisfied with the criminal activity within the OST Judiciary.  To this date, no real accountability has been sought from OST law and order programs funded with millions of U.S. tax dollars.

“Taxpayers need to understand what is happening here on Pine Ridge,” Canupa Gluha Mani said. “Judiciary employees are stealing money from court programs, using legal paperwork to silence or imprison critics, and even tricking people out of their EBT food cards for the promise of legal assistance that never comes.”

Often, the OST Tribal Council and Executive Office uses with the police as an arm of enforcement against outspoken grassroots Lakota and their families.  Grassroots elders and not allowed to contest ordinances or speak out in tribal council. If they do so, they are threatened with jail including false charges of “Inciting a Riot.”

The OST police have routinely acted with both bias and incompetence.  Non-Lakota officers often respond with aggression in attempts to intimidate traditional and grassroots Lakota people, and are quick to rely on their weapons even if not threatened.  On the other hand, drug-related crime is epidemic, murders routinely go unsolved or unprosecuted, and police are routinely implicated in illegal acts by grassroots people.

In June 2016, Jamie Lee Brave Heart was shot and killed by a Pine Ridge tribal police officer while at the Pine Ridge hospital.

In February 2017, the OST police failed to follow-up on a missing person report, and two weeks later the Strong Heart Warrior Society found the frozen body of 49 year old Donna Scout following pleas from her family to find their missing daughter.  OST police then tried to claim responsibility for the search.

In April 2017, Jeffery Curry of the Allen community on Pine Ridge was brutally murdered by OST police after a long chase. Eleven OST police officers were placed on administrative leave, the Public Safety Board was disbanded, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs has taken over reservation law enforcement.

Police have also been accused of tipping off and protecting drug traffickers and dropped-charges-for-sex with minor girls and young women.

“The OST is still begging the Department of Justice for more money for public safety, but on Pine Ridge there is just white officers and indian officers killing Lakota people randomly,” an angry warrior leader explained.

Other OST employees implicated by grassroots people in the widespread corruption are Sonia Little Hawk Weston, Lydia Bear Killer, Stanley Little White Man, and Cora Whiting Hildebrand.

So why won’t the Federal government assert accountability over tax-funded tribal programs?

Many activists say the U.S. Government allows continuing corruption  in order to justify the eventual termination of all tribal government programs and a forced removal of jurisdiction and tribal identity to State of South Dakota control. In this scenario, any sovereign rights of Lakota people will be terminated as they become U.S. and South Dakota residents.

And this is not a far-fetched idea. In December of 2016, the incoming Trump Administration threatened to terminate Indigenous jurisdiction and privatize Native land for resource extraction. And now, the BIA is taking a more active role in Pine Ridge activities.

“The tribal council is hiding criminal activity that jeopardizes tribal sovereignty,” Canupa Gluha Mani said. “But the grassroots people and the Independent Lakota Nation are ready for any threat to our nation status.”

The Strong Heart Warrior Society of the Independent Lakota Nation is submitting another complaint to the United States Government based on these allegations.

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The Cante Tenza Okolakiciye or Strong Heart Warrior Society is a traditional Lakota warrior society as well as a modern day human rights movement to assert Lakota independence and enforce Indigenous rights for the Lakota and other Indigenous people of Turtle Island.  

Canupa Mani Gluha Fights State Jurisdiction

The OST Tribal Council, U.S. Government, and South Dakota explore surrending jurisdiction on Pine Ridge Reservation up to 15 miles inside the rez border in every direction!  But in less than 2 minutes, Canupa Gluha Mani reveals the utter and racist absurdity of any US Federal, State or local entity overseeing the jurisdiction of the Lakota Oyate (or any other Indigenous nation). THIS is the power of language and the Independent Lakota Nation.

Strong Heart in Blackfeet Nation

Cante Tenza of the Independent Lakota Nation is in Blackfeet Nation at the invitation of grassroots Blackfeet elders and activists to fight state theft of Blackfeet water rights through the newly approved Blackfeet Water Compact.

The Blackfeet Business Council has used many tactics to silence and intimidate the grassroots people and the Water Compact vote occurred when many traditional and grassroots people are at the gatherings.

We will continue to support our Blackfeet Nation relatives in their resistance and grow the movement towards authentic Indigenous independence!

Photos/Media from DOJ Meetings

These are the latest photos or video from grassroots Oyate meetings with the Dept. of Justice on April 7th and 14th. These are from our Blackfeet relatives at the Sukapi Times.

During the latest meeting on April 14th, Strong Heart refused entry to Pennington County Sheriff unless they took off their badges and guns. The Sheriff’s office would not comply, and were denied.  This is asserting Indigenous independence!

 

Public Announcement For Friday Meeting with the DOJ

Cante Tenza Okolakiciye – Strong Heart Warrior Society
Independent Lakota Nation
P.O. Box 512 Hill City, SD 57745
Unceeded Lakota Territory

April 12, 2017
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT – BREAKING NEWS – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Canupa Gluha Mani at 605-517-1547

Grassroots Lakota Oyate Called to Meet with Department of Justice on Friday in Rapid City, SD

Focus of 2nd Meeting will be Violence and Abuses by Law Enforcement Against Lakota and Other Native Persons

Date:   Friday April 14, 2017
Time:   1:00pm – 4:00pm

Career Learning Center
730 East Watertown Street, Room 107

Rapid City, South Dakota, Lakota Territory

Traditional and grassroots Lakota Oyate are urged to attend the second meeting with the Department of Justice to provide testimony on the abuse, violence, and discrimination they face at the hands of law enforcement of Rapid City, Pennington County, other border towns, as well as BIA Tribal Government law enforcement.

Representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice will be there to record your testimony. Bring pictures, video, documents and other evidence you would like to present.

These meetings are the result of exhaustive work by the Cante Tenza Okolakiciye Strong Heart Warrior Society of the Independent Lakota Nation and we will be there to provide security. Please notify Strong Heart immediately if you encounter any problems with police while traveling to the event.

* Parking on north side of building. Entrance through the  double doors and  walk to the front. Sue or Sally will assist you to the room.

Further questions can be addressed to Strong Heart headman Canupa Gluha Mani at 605-517-1547.